Most Hackaday readers are no doubt familiar with the Faraday cage, at least in name, and

Most Hackaday readers are no doubt familiar with the Faraday cage, at least in name, and nearly everyone owns one: if you’ve ever stood watching a bag of popcorn slowly revolve inside of a microwave, you’be seen Michael Faraday’s 1836 invention in action. Yet despite being such a well known device, the average hacker still doesn’t have one in their arsenal. But why? It could be that there’s a certain mystique about Faraday cages, an assumption that their construction requires techniques or materials outside the realm of the home hacker. While it’s true that building a perfect Faraday cage for a given frequency involves math and careful attention to detail, putting together a simple model for general purpose use and experimentation turns out to be quick and easy. As an exercise in minimalist hacking I recently built a basic Faraday cage out of materials sourced from Home Depot, and thought it would be interesting to not only describe its construction but give some ideas as to how one can put it to practical use in the home lab. While it’s hardly a perfect specimen, it clearly works, and it didn’t take anything that can’t be sourced locally pretty much anywhere in the world. At th...

Campagnolo goes 12-speed with Super Record and Record rim and disc groupsets

It was bound to happen sooner or later. Campagnolo is now the first major component company to add a 12-cog sprocket to its road drivetrains with its Super Record and Record mechanical groupsets, for rim-brake and disc-brake applications. The story of the Campagnolo’s new releases is bigger than just another gear, though. Both the Super Record and Record groupsets are entirely new from tip to tail — cables and housing included — with more refined ergonomics, improved shifting performance, and redesigned rim brakes to keep the faithful up to speed. Before we dive into the details on each new component, it’s worth discussing why Campagnolo has gone to 12-speed in the first place. Campagnolo’s decision isn’t just a matter of one-upping the competition, even though it may seem that way initially. There’s sound logic behind the move, and while the change will undoubtedly create a lot of headache, it makes sense overall. Campagnolo first made the jump from 10-speed to 11-speed back in 2008. Compact cranksets with 50/34-tooth chainrings were becoming much more common already at that point, but the gearing ranges for the cassettes were still fairly narrow back then, often bottoming out ...