Rock Pi 4 With M.2 Extender: ARM CPU + NVMe Drive Performance Reviewed

The RK3399 SoC has been used in a huge variety of devices. From Chromebooks to SBCs, routers, TV boxes, and even the upcoming Pinebook Pro. With its six cores, gigabit ethernet, USB 3.0, and PCIe support, it’s clearly an SBC powerhouse in the ARM world. I’ve often wondered what kind of benefit was actually gained from using an SSD with an ARM CPU, though. So, I put the Rock Pi 4 to the test. We’ve covered the Rock Pi 4 before, which you can check out here. It’s a very solid SBC with the RK3399 CPU, which has been modeled in the image of the Raspberry Pi. It bears an almost identical footprint by using the known and beloved Raspberry Pi form factor. This becomes all the more impressive when considering that it comes with six cores, up to 4GB of RAM, PCIe x4 in the form of an M.2 connector, 2x USB 3.0, USB C, 2x USB 2.0, gigabit ethernet, 5GHz wireless, Bluetooth, and a Raspberry Pi compatible GPIO array. There’s more connectivity on this board than any project can sensibly make use of. For a long time, people have struggled with using Raspberry Pis because they’re very slow. Running a system update for the first time in a while can tie up your Pi for an hour. Especially if you’ve...

Let’s get one thing clear: it is my opinion that the 2020 Explorer XLT is not

Let’s get one thing clear: it is my opinion that the 2020 Explorer XLT is not the best 2020 Explorer. Powered by a 2.3-liter Ecoboost four-pot, the XLT falls far short of the 400 horsepower 3.0-liter Ecoboost V6 found in ST trim. As a proponent of acceleration, your author will always select the biggest engine. Not everyone will, however. Scads of buyers, many of whom lie directly in the target market of Ford’s new Explorer, will think the 300 horse mill is more than suitable. In that frame of mind, let’s find out what $36,675 buys you at a Ford store these days. The myopic and cataract-addled will carp that the 2020 Explorer doesn’t look significantly different from the 2019 model, at least not different enough to warrant the label of “new.” What they fail to register is the switch to a big-league rear-drive platform, the Explorer configuration that nature and Henry Ford intended. The XLT is indeed a RWD machine, with the addition of 4×4 tacking $2,000 onto the Monroney. A ten-speed automatic is standard across the board. Colors aplenty dot the XLT’s order sheet, with the natty Atlas Blue leading the way in your author’s jaundiced eye. Sadly, the tasty Rapid Red is...